Micro-Organisms Attack Paint and Why Do We Need a Paint Test?

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How Do Micro-Organisms Attack Paint and Why Do We Need a Paint Test?

 

How Do Micro-Organisms Attack Paint

 

What are exactly micro-organisms attack the paint, Paints have two major motivations: domestic and commercial. Paint testing is used to check and protect the surface from corrosion, degradation, and discoloration in the areas where it has been added.

The painted layers are disrupted or discolored as a result of weathering and deterioration, promoting the development and work of biological organisms.

Throughout the degradation process, a variety of microbes such as microscopic bacteria, fungal growth, algal growth, and protozoans are actively involved.

Temperature is a significant environmental factor that contributes to painting deterioration.

Micro-organisms attack the paint and their behaviors can destroy water-based paints, reducing the paint’s shelf life and the house’s longevity.

Because of the use of different polymer compounds used in paint production, it is vulnerable to corrosion and poses a risk to the environment.

On painted surfaces, a variety of micro-organisms attack paint may emerge

Different Paint- Tests 

Determination of the Microbial Condition of Paint, Paint Raw Materials, and Plant Areas Test (ASTM D 5588)

This test method covers a procedure for (micro-organisms attack paint)the determination of the microbial condition (contamination or sterility) of raw materials used in the manufacture of paint, and the microbial condition of paint and paint manufacturing areas.

This test method details protocols for obtaining samples for sterility testing from wet or dry products and plant locations, conducting sterility testing on such samples to see whether they are polluted, evaluating the degree of contamination, if any, and including a checklist for any measure of the form of contamination present (bacterial, fungal, yeast, etc.).

This test procedure does not take any of the steps necessary to ensure the degree of sterility needed for the most reliable results. It is recommended that you have some experience with microbiological techniques.

Why this Test?

The use of polluted raw materials, water (especially recycled wash water), vessels, pipes, and equipment in the manufacturing plant is often linked to painting spoilage in the container. 

A simple method to determine the presence or absence of microorganisms in paint and coatings manufacturing plants is needed.

This information allows the producer to pinpoint the source of pollution (raw materials or problematic housekeeping areas in the plant) and work toward resolving the spoilage issue.

This test method details protocols for obtaining samples for sterility testing from wet or dry products and plant locations, conducting sterility testing on such samples to see whether they are polluted, evaluating the degree of contamination, if any, and including a checklist for any measure of the form of contamination present (bacterial, fungal, yeast, etc.).

However, this test procedure does not take any of the steps necessary to ensure the degree of sterility needed for the most reliable results.

Testing Guidelines 

When collecting samples, take all appropriate precautions to prevent microbial contamination.

Wearing a face mask and sterilized gloves is an option. (Warning: Do not touch the swab near the cotton tip or any other areas of the swab that can come into contact with the test sample.)

Microorganisms from the skin, clothes and even the environment will contaminate the sample if exposed for too long.

Do not strike every portion of the swab except the cap if the swab has one. Additional tests should be used to confirm suspect results.

For each sample, use a fresh clean swab, tongue depressor, or spatula. Any sampling instruments cannot be reused.

If you’re using gloves, make sure to throw them away after each use.

To prevent misleading contamination effects, limit the time clean products are exposed to the environment while taking samples.

 Alternatively, the liquid sample could be transported to the sterile storage area in a sterilized bottle.

During sampling, handling, and transportation to the testing area, make sure no non-sterile items come into contact with the liquid sample (for example, use a sterile pipet, etc. for material transfer to a container, et cetera).

Dry materials can be sampled in the same way as mentioned earlier. Wipe a wide section of the exterior of the container clean with a clean rag or paper towel to sample unopened, dried raw materials in bags.

Inside the cleaned field, cut open the bag with a clean knife.

Scoop 10 to 15 g into a sterile plastic bag, close, and seal bag for transport to the sterile testing area, using a sterile tongue depressor or sterile spatula.

NOTE – To reduce the risk of inadvertent exposure, thoroughly clean the region of the bag to be sliced, as well as the knife used to cut it, with isopropyl alcohol.

There is no requirement to sterilize machine surfaces when checking open containers of raw materials, vats, barrels, and so on.

However, any bacteria found could have been added after the package was opened.

The presence of contaminants in samples obtained from machinery surfaces does not inherently imply that the substance stored or processed within is also polluted.

Why Do We Need a Paint Test?

Result Evaluation 

Bacterial contamination (aerobic) is generally characterized by milky spots of varying sizes (bacterial colonies) on the agar surface. These are usually slimy or shiny in appearance. 

Fungal contamination is generally characterized by spots that are usually filamentous and fuzzier in appearance, with the exception of yeasts which normally look similar to the bacterial colonies. 

NOTE – If present, bacteria should grow on the TSA plates, but bacteria can also grow on the PDA or malt extract plates, particularly if they are not acidified.

Fungi can also grow on the TSA plates, and yeast, in particular, can look like bacterial contamination.

Differentiation between bacterial and fungal growth can require more sophisticated techniques than are covered in this test method.

Assistance can be obtained from your biocide supplier. 

 If there are no spots appearing on the agar surface by the end of the incubation period, then the test sample or area was most likely sterile (free of contamination).

Standard Test Method for Resistance of Emulsion Paints in the Container to Attack by Microorganisms – (ASTM D2574)

This test method covers the determination of the relative resistance of emulsion paints to attack in the container by microorganisms.

Why Perform this test? 

Putrefaction, lowered pH, gas formation, and a drop in viscosity will all result from paint spotting in the bottle.

This test method establishes a basic protocol for determining emulsion paints’ susceptibility to microbial degradation. 

The findings should allow: 

(1) the paint manufacturer to choose an appropriate preservative; and 

(2) the preservative provider to compare the efficiency of competitive and developmental preservatives in emulsion paints.

This test procedure can be used for people who have a basic understanding of microbiology.

NOTE: The methods used have a significant impact on the reliability of the findings produced from this research process.

Incorrect procedures may cause a sterile sample to appear polluted, or even worse, a contaminated sample to appear sterile.

To check any doubtful findings, you can consult your biocide provider, raw material supplier, or an independent testing laboratory.

The consistency of the formulation and raw materials will also influence the test results.


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